We Should Be Better Than This

  • 1/16/2009 04:20:00 pm
  • By Mark Gibbings-Jones
  • 4 Comments

It's too obvious. It's too easy. It's tantamount to grabbing a toddler's painting of a house, and roaring into their tiny confused faces about how rubbish the brushwork is, and how they haven't even got a rudimentary grasp of perspective for flip's sake. Ah, what the heck.

RETURN OF THE BBC SHOCKOMETER

And The Big Breaking News Story On The BBC Is... A Stolen Hamster (Daily Mail, 16th January 2008)

The story:

"There is war in Gaza and an economic crisis gripping the world. But yesterday the BBC left viewers slightly dumbfounded by its latest breaking news story. People could have been forgiven for adjusting their sets when they were told in big headlines - that a hamster had been stolen.

[,,,]

Some viewers were forced to do a double-take when seeing the item, surprised that the corporation would broadcast such an obscure story."

What this means:

The BBC's rolling-news channel has included a light-hearted story that took up a couple of moments, taking up a minuscule fraction of the time devoted to coverage of Gaza and the ongoing economic crisis. So, using the same logic, let's take a look at what the BIG BREAKING STORIES are on the Daily Mail's website:



BONG! Britons occasionally swear. Ross, Brand, BBC quite clearly to blame.




BONG! Woman too smelly to buy groceries, by extension Tesco hate countryside.



BONG! Famous woman has hair done. Conflict in Gaza not pictured.

So, how does that story register?



Barely a flicker. Now, if anyone with uber-7337 haxxoring skillz is able to sneak into the Mail's website, please could they adjust part of the story so it reads -

"Some viewers were forced to do a double-take when seeing the item [citation needed]"

- we'd be very grateful.

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